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Fitness  Articles

Weight Management
Your guide to Obesity & Bariatric Surgery

Obesity isn’t just a concern about how people look from the outside. Obesity is a complex disorder of the body resulting from an excessive amount of body fat. Once considered as a problem of developed countries, obesity rates are on the rise in middle and low-income countries, as well. In the last 30 years, the prevalence of obesity is more than doubled. But when is a person considered as obese? Normally, people with a BMI over 30 are considered obese. However, there are three different classes of obesity. People with a BMI from 30 - 34.9 are considered as Class I, people with a BMI from 35 – 39.9 are considered as Class II, while people with a BMI over 40 are considered as Class III or extremely obese. What is BMI and how is it calculated? BMI, also known as Body Mass Index, is calculated by dividing the weight in kilograms by the height in meters squared. Being obese increases the risks for many serious health conditions and diseases, like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart diseases, etc., a situation that we all should be aware off and try to maintain normal body weight before the situation gets out of control. The most important thing in controlling and dealing with obesity is changing the diet. Behavioral changes, as well as physical activity, also help lose weight. However, in some cases medications as well as weight – loss surgeries are necessary to get rid of that extra fat. Especially in really extreme cases, with Class III obesity the only solution that makes a change is bariatric surgery. But, what is bariatric surgery and when is it recommended? Bariatric surgery is a safe and very effective treatment option, as mentioned especially for those dealing with extreme obesity. However, not every obese patient is a perfect fit for this type of surgery. Several criteria need to be fulfilled before an obese person is considered as the right fit for the surgery, like: 1. BMI over 40 2. BMI 35 to 39.9, accompanied by high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or even sleep apnea. 3. No drug problems 4. No alcohol problems 5. No uncontrolled psychological conditions 6. No endocrine causes of obesity 7. Failed attempts for weight loss, etc. Like any other surgical procedure, even bariatric surgery has its own risks and possible complications. Before making up your mind for this treatment option, it is well advised to consider and discuss all the risks and benefits with the health care provider. What are the benefits of bariatric surgery? It results in weight loss of 10 – 35% of the total body weight. However, these changes occur during a period of one to three years after the surgery. What are the risks and possible complications of bariatric surgery? This kind of surgery does not make miracles happen and people suffering from obesity will not always gain their desired body weight. So, this means that having realistic expectations is very important, as some patients are not satisfied with their weight after bariatric surgery. There is also always the possibility of gaining back all the weight, especially if this surgical treatment is not followed by a complete change of diet, physical activity, and everyday life. Technical problems like separated stitches and complications with the surgical procedure itself are also possible. Other possible risks associated with bariatric surgery include adverse reactions to anesthesia, excessive bleeding, infections, lung problems, breathing problems, blood clots, leaks in the gastrointestinal system and in very rare cases even death. Long term risks and complications of bariatric surgery also include dumping syndrome, hernias, malnutrition, ulcers, stomach perforation, bowel obstruction, etc. Choosing the right type of bariatric surgery is not an easy task. There are different types of bariatric surgery available today, like: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass  Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a non – reversible surgical method which consists in reducing the size of the stomach, by creating a small pouch and attaching the small intestines directly to the new stomach pouch created. This way a person can eat very small portions of food. However, the food also bypasses most of the stomach and the first section of small intestines, entering directly to the middle part of the small intestines. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding  Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is another surgical method for treating diabetes which consists of placement of a belt around the upper part of the stomach. The belt itself once placed into its position, it separates the stomach in two parts the upper pouch which is smaller, and a lower pouch of the stomach which is larger. The band is connected with some tubes to a port that is placed below the skin of the abdominal wall. Fluid can be poured through the port, which fills the balloon, slowing this way the passage of food from the upper stomach pouch to the lower stomach pouch. Vertical banded gastroplasty Vertical banded gastroplasty consists in dividing the stomach into two parts, restricting this way the amount of food a person can eat. However, this type of bariatric surgery is not that popular, when compared to other bariatric surgery types due to the fact that the results are not so impressing. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch is a surgical procedure that results in removing about 80% of the stomach. The pyloric valve remains as well as a small part of the small intestine that normally connects to the stomach. This way, this type of surgery not only limits the amount of food a person can eat, but it also reduces the absorption of nutrients. Sleeve gastrectomy Sleeve gastrectomy is a new type of bariatric surgery. During this procedure, the stomach structure is changed to be shaped like a tube, which will normally restrict the amount of food a person can eat and the amount of food that is absorbed. Remember that treating obesity is very difficult. However, the most important thing is to have a healthy life, especially a healthy diet with a lot of fruits and vegetables, regular daily activity and a total change of the way you are living. Only with hard work and determination, you can achieve your goals. Regardless of your methods or type of bariatric surgery that you have chosen, you should always look and try all your options in treating obesity. Keep in mind that with obesity, many other health problems come, affecting your overall health.

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February 05, 2019
Lifeline Hospital
Health & Wellness Partner
Weight Management
Can you keep the cellulite away?

Orange peel syndrome, cottage cheese skin, hail damage… None of the terms commonly used to describe cellulite could be deemed flattering. And the medical names – adiposis oedematous, dermopanniculosis deformans, status protrusus cutis, and gynoid lipodystrophy – don’t make it sound much better either. But why is cellulite such a dirty word? Well, apart from the fact that we’re conditioned to seeing media images of ‘perfect’ bodies with smooth skin as the norm, it could have something to do with the common misconception about the cause. Many people assume that it’s solely the result of an unhealthy lifestyle and being overweight but, while these things may contribute to those dimples, it’s certainly not the whole story. The reality is, cellulite affects people of all sizes, shapes, lifestyles and even gender – though admittedly it is quite rare in men. However, it affects up to an estimated 90% of women at some point in their lives. So what’s behind this common complaint? Is it unhealthy? And is there anything you can do about it?  What exactly is cellulite? Cellulite is the lumpy or dimpled appearance of the skin – often on the hips, thighs, and buttocks – caused by fat deposits pushing into the connective tissue just beneath the skin’s surface. This shows more in women than men because women have more fat and thinner skin. Also, cells in the collagen, the main protein of the connective tissue, aren’t cross-linked as they are in men, so are less efficient at holding back the fat. But while fat might play a part, that’s not to say it’s caused by too much of it. Cellulite may also appear due to shrinking or damage to the connective tissues, as happens with aging, causing whatever fat is there to protrude. Cellulite is the lumpy or dimpled appearance of the skin – often on the hips, thighs, and buttocks – caused by fat deposits pushing into the connective tissue just beneath the skin’s surface. It’s also important to say now that cellulite is a totally normal type of fat and is not in itself dangerous, nor is it necessarily indicative of our overall health and fitness.  Cellulite: What are the causes? As for causes, they are hard to pinpoint precisely – but there are plenty of factors known to contribute. Some you can change, and some you can’t. Genetics is an important one and, obviously, fits into the latter group. I’m sorry to say that if your mum complained of her orange peel skin, there’s a good chance you’ll get it too. In ‘Cellulite: Pathophysiology and Treatment’, Mitchel P Goldman and Doris Hexsel found that 80% of women with cellulite also reported having a close relative with the condition. Hormones are also known to be a factor. And perhaps unsurprisingly estrogen – a hormone found in much higher levels in women than men – plays a role. But it’s a complicated process that’s not fully understood and other hormones are also thought to be involved.  So what can you do? I know what you’re thinking: if cellulite isn’t harming your health then why suggest ways to prevent or get rid of it? Well, the truth is, you don’t have to do anything about it, but most people don’t like how it looks. And on a positive note, a lot of the things that will help to get rid of it – or at least reduce it – are actually beneficial for your health. So let’s take a look at them  Losing excess weight: Even though being overweight or obese is not the cause of cellulite, it’s likely to make it look a whole lot worse, simply because there’s more fat to push through the connective tissue. Since excess weight is a risk factor for a whole host of serious conditions, from coronary heart disease to strokes, type 2 diabetes, several types of cancer and fatty liver disease, it makes sense to keep yours in the healthy range. If you think you have a weight problem, ask your doctor for advice.  Even though being overweight or obese is not the cause of cellulite, it’s likely to make it look a whole lot worse, simply because there’s more fat to push through the connective tissue. Rethinking your diet: Any diet that’s too high in calories is likely to result in increased fat stores, elevating the likelihood of cellulite. Too much sugar, in particular, is bad news. Sugar’s role in cellulite development is two-fold. First, it kicks starts the release of insulin, which among other things, speeds up the absorption of excess sugar into fat cells. On top of this, sugar molecules also bind to proteins within the body – a process known as glycation – which can cause damage to connective tissue. So, increased levels of fat plus weakened connective tissue equals a double whammy as far as cellulite is concerned. The best way to cut back is to avoid refined carbohydrates and foods with added sugar such as white bread, rice, and pasta, cakes, certain breakfast cereals, sweets, and biscuits. Stick to fruit and vegetables – focus on foods that are packed with nutrients and fiber and are more satisfying than refined carbs, which cause energy spikes and dips, encouraging overeating. Plenty of lean protein such as chicken, fish, eggs, and nuts will help to satisfy your appetite and keep your blood sugar levels stable. Getting plenty of foods that are high in water-content and antioxidants will help to reduce inflammation of the blood vessels and keep your connective tissue strong and supple. Berries, leafy vegetables, cucumber, banana, radishes, and tomatoes are all good choices. Plus, it makes sense to reduce your intake of salt, which could encourage fluid retention and may make cellulite appear worse. Either way, too much salt is bad news for heart health so should be kept in check. Three-quarters of the salt we consume is from processed food so always read the label. The UK’s Department of Health recommends that adults should consume no more than 6g of salt (2.4g sodium) per day. Get moving: Exercise – or rather a lack of it – also has a part to play. When we exercise regularly, as well as burning fat we stimulate our blood circulation and essentially feed the skin with vital nutrients that help to keep it supple and elastic. Therefore, the less we exercise, the less we deliver these essential vitamins and the faster the skin loses elasticity. While exercise won’t guarantee getting rid of cellulite, anything that helps to reduce fat and firm up cellulite problem areas such as the thighs and buttocks can help to reduce visible signs. Cardio exercise such as cycling, running, rowing, swimming or aerobics, is great for fat burning, but depending on your level of fitness there’s nothing better in my opinion than High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) to shift any unwanted weight. However, you may want to check with your doctor first if you have a serious health condition, are very out of shape or have joint problems. In addition, strength and weight-training – focusing on the buttocks, quads, and hamstrings – can help to build muscle and give a more toned look.  Go smoke-free: Smoking is bad for pretty much every part of the body, and the skin is no exception. It wreaks havoc on the cardiovascular system, damaging blood vessels and impairing circulation. Besides leading to heart disease – and a whole host of other killer conditions – it ultimately contributes to the weakened blood supply to the skin, which results in reduced elasticity and potentially cellulite. This is also why smokers often look much older than their years. So if you smoke, it makes sense to quit.  Keep alcohol moderate: Alcohol has a similar effect to sugar, by providing excess calories that can be turned into fat. It also increases production of the stress hormone cortisol, which stimulates fat absorption by fat cells, especially around the waist and stomach. Added to that, it can increase appetite and reduce energy so you don’t feel like exercising. Too much can also lead to poor circulation in the long term, reducing the oxygen and nutrients reaching all the cells in the body. Try to have at least three alcohol-free days a week and stick to no more than one or two drinks per day on the remaining days.  Alcohol increases production of the stress hormone cortisol, which stimulates fat absorption by fat cells, especially around the waist and stomach. Be cautious about creams: Finally, there’s a wide and wonderful array of creams that claim to reduce signs of cellulite and while I’m reticent to say that none of them work, they are certainly not the miracle cures many claims to be. Any skin cream that improves hydration certainly can’t hurt but to see any results it must be combined with the measures above. Say goodbye to cellulite? Unfortunately, there’s no magic bullet that’s guaranteed to get rid of cellulite. But follow this advice and you’ll be going a good way towards reducing or preventing the dimpled look. You’ll also be doing your health the world of good. Trimming body fat, strengthening muscles, quitting smoking and improving your diet and exercise regime will reduce your risk of some of the biggest disease killers out there, as well as leaving you feeling fitter, healthier and happier – orange peel or no orange peel.

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February 05, 2019
Novomed Integrative Medicine
Health & Wellness Partner
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Training
Sudden heart attacks: Should the aging fitness buff be concerned?

Thinking about trying Ironman this year? Maybe a half-marathon to start? Or perhaps you’re just going to join a gym for the first time in a while. Whether you turned twenty-one last week or you’re starting to think about retirement, us doctors simply love to prescribe fitness. Along with quitting smoking, sleeping more, and eating a healthy diet, it’s the lifestyle change we attach to many treatments. And with good reason – the power of fitness is undeniable. It’s highly effective at preventing and treating many chronic diseases, with benefits to blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, memory, energy, and weight. I even wrote about its mood-boosting influence in a recent article. In that piece, I touched upon how beneficial exercise can be for your heart and lungs. It is vital to point out that the older you are, the more aware you should be of the risks very strenuous activity may pose. The dangers of strenuous exercise for older people From US data we know that those who are choosing to exercise are in general likely to be older – 35 years-old and up. What is the significance of this? Well, older people, especially males, are at a higher risk than their younger counterparts of an unexpected loss of heart function, or sudden cardiac death, during strenuous physical exercise. Older people, especially males, are at a higher risk than their younger counterparts of an unexpected loss of heart function, or sudden cardiac death, during strenuous physical exercise. Let’s be clear, the risk is small and it shouldn’t deter you from exercising. But as the old adage goes, it’s better to be safe than sorry. So let’s take a look at why aging fitness buffs are at a raised risk of a heart attack, and then consider how regular screening – in particular, Ultrafast Heart scan CT or Calcium Score evaluation –can help mitigate this potential threat. Understanding cardiac risk for older people Within our ‘older fitness buff’ population, there are two main groups I’d like to focus on: those starting out and those who push themselves that extra mile. Of course, this doesn’t mean everyone else should ignore the risk, it simply means these two groups, in particular, are well analyzed. Here is what I tell my patients: When you are deconditioned, the fibers in your heart become like a dried up, old, and unused rubber band. If you suddenly stretch it, it breaks. If you gently stretch it several times, it regains its elasticity. One study found that it was coronary artery disease (CAD) which was responsible for more than 80% of the cases of sudden cardiac death during sports-related activity in older people. CAD is an all-encompassing term for the build-up of cholesterol and calcium on the walls of arteries, caused in part by a poor diet, smoking and lack of exercise. Age is also a big risk factor, partly because those negative consequences have had time to accumulate, and partly because our arteries harden as we grow older. As calcium and cholesterol gather, it can break off causing minor ruptures in the wall, which are then fixed by small blood clots. All these combine to narrow the artery. The same amount of blood is now trying to push through a smaller space, increasing the pressure, until eventually, a big rupture occurs. The ‘plaque’ that breaks off then blocks the artery, causing a heart attack. While regular physical activity reduces the risk of heart disease in the long-term, for those who already have signs of disease, the increased strain can paradoxically raise the risk in the short-term – that is, during exercise itself. This is of particular concern in the UAE, where rates of cardiovascular disease are some of the highest in the world, leading to 30% of all deaths. One recent piece of research in the Netherlands really highlights how common CAD is, even infrequent exercisers, and how invisible it can be without the proper approach. In this study, 300 athletes were scanned – all of them were over 45 and showed no symptoms of CAD during regular electrocardiogram (ECG) tests. Incredibly, 19% turned out to be at risk of some form of heart attacks when further investigations were carried out, this time using CT scans, to ascertain the athletes’ calcium score. In fact, the recommendations from the study were that screening of all middle-aged athletes would be prudent. One recent piece of research in the Netherlands really highlights how common CAD is, even infrequent exercisers, and how invisible it can be without the proper approach. As for the true fitness buffs – the aged ultramarathon runner or Ironman triathlete – these people place a workload on their heart that is many times more than what is required (or recommended) to prevent heart disease. What’s important here is that older endurance athletes have a five-fold increased prevalence of an irregular heartbeat, also called an arrhythmia, than the general population. But why is this? The working theory is that extensive endurance exercise may ultimately have negative effects by stimulating changes to the structure of the heart and arteries. The body is adapting to the ongoing stress placed on its cardiovascular system. The strain leads to fibrosis, the medical term for ‘thickening’, of the arteries or heart muscle. Eventually, the heart can begin to beat irregularly or its chambers can change in size. Know your risk – no matter what your age First, a note if you’re aged under 35. You might be feeling pretty good right now but while the risk of sudden heart problem is far less in young people, it still exists. In fact, in this population, the problem is less to do with heart disease and more to do with genetic abnormalities. As a doctor, I’m sometimes asked to assess cardiac risk in patients, especially those who are older and aiming to start exercising more. If this is you, a useful place to start is the American Heart Association (AHA) pre-participation questionnaire. It assesses risk by asking ‘yes or no’ questions about, among other things, age, previous heart and chest problems, blood pressure, smoking, cholesterol levels, and weight. Say ‘yes’ too many times and an evaluation by a physician is recommended. A doctor will take a more detailed history and perform a physical evaluation. You may hear the words ‘Framingham score’ mentioned. This is a short form that uses the result of the evaluation to calculate the risk of a cardiac event over the next ten years. If considered high, a non-invasive scan or measurement may be recommended in an attempt to garner more information. A common measurement is the ECG but while useful it doesn’t tell the whole story. A bad reading does not necessarily mean anything is wrong; a good reading isn’t proof of no problem. In fact, in the Netherlands study, I mentioned earlier, where 19% of seemingly healthy athletes were at high coronary risk, all of them showed no sign of ischaemia (problems with blood supply to the heart muscles) on their ECG. So is there a better solution? Yes. The Dutch researchers went on to use a newer, more accurate, non-invasive assessment called a Heartscan CT which is useful for all types of fitness buff because it measures, among other things, calcium build-up and wall thickness. It’s also quick, taking just five minutes. Lowering your risk Of course, the first step is advice you may have heard before: Avoid smoking, cut down on alcohol and sugar, and reduce stress. When it comes to exercise, it’s best to speak to your doctor first to ensure you’re doing more good than harm. When it comes to exercise, it’s best to speak to your doctor first to ensure you’re doing more good than harm. You may later wish to look into chelation therapy, where a chemical solution is administered into the bloodstream to extract toxic metals. And as mentioned, the Heartscan CT for Calcium Score evaluation is quick and can provide accurate results. A small risk that’s not worth risking Exercise is great. It’s fun, healthy, and makes you feel better. But for some of us, it also comes with a small risk. Revealing that risk requires just a brief assessment and scan. So, if you’re older and thinking of upping your game on the fitness front, the starting line should be your doctor’s office.

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February 05, 2019
Novomed Integrative Medicine
Health & Wellness Partner
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Training
7 Food fixings to build muscles this Movember

Gentlemen! It’s finally Movember! Apart from growing a stache or a beard, do you know what else you should be growing? That’s right an amazing new lifestyle towards a healthier you! Do you want to be fit and healthy? Do you want to be ripped? DO THE WORK! Sculpting muscles and building rock hard abs have to start way before you hit the gym. There are three key factors you need to grow muscle: doing exercise, drinking plenty of fluids and of course eating energy-rich food! This tandem will boost your workouts, repair muscle tissue and help you build the body you want! 7 Food Fixings to Build Muscles this Movember The Game Plan You need to eat food that not only provides energy but also helps to restore cells and bulk up the muscles. Here are some ‘must-haves’ to include in your system! Lean Meat - This is a great source of protein, iron and amino acids. Iron helps to carry oxygen to the muscles and amino acids promote muscle growth. Dark Meat Chicken - The dark meat provides 25% more iron and three times more zinc compared to the white meat. Zinc helps promote a healthy immune system. Eggs - These tiny things contain all the essential amino acids your body needs. Try having 1 a day. Also, don’t skip the yolk! Half the protein in eggs is found in the yolk along with other important nutrients that promote eye health and more.  Beans & Whole Grains - These are the best possible carbs you could load on. They contain small amounts of protein, fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants. All of which can provide energy and promote muscle repair.  Low-Fat Dairy - These provide high-quality protein, essential vitamins, potassium, carbs, and calcium. In fact, chocolate milk has been scientifically proven to be a great workout recovery beverage! If you happen to lactose intolerant, you can still get the same nutrition from yogurt with active cultures. Nuts - Another great source of protein, vitamins, fiber, antioxidants, and healthy fats. Just make sure to eat them unsalted; raw or roasted. Fruits & Vegetables - Everyone knows that these are the foundation of all healthy eating habits! Chock full of vitamins, minerals, and some veggies have protein too all to provide total body nutrition. Get the Right Timing Timing is crucial when it comes to developing your muscles correctly! Yes, that does sound funny but think about it. You need carbs and protein to perform strength training and muscle recovery. Therefore you need to eat food that contains both and small amounts of healthy fats throughout the day. Your body needs time to digest and process everything you eat and drink! What you can do is create a schedule, for example: drink chocolate milk within an hour after your workout and have a meal 1-2 hours after. So plan accordingly the food, the workouts and the time! The only way you can build and sculpt defined muscles is through progressive resistance training and the right meal plan to go with it. Push yourself to grow! If you need a better idea of the kind of food and portioning, you can always get a specially designed food plan from a registered dietitian. Don’t forget to coordinate with your trainer to challenge yourself without injury. Good luck! Got any other ideas to share with your fellow man? Man up this Movember and drop those tips down below!

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February 05, 2019
Lifeline Hospital
Health & Wellness Partner
Weight Management
10 Ways to Loss Weight this Winter

Snuggling in a warm toasty bed or getting up to work out? On a cold, dark winter’s day, the first choice is ALWAYS so tempting! What is it about winter that makes us throw our healthy routines out the window? Do we have some animalistic urge to binge eat and hibernate? Hopefully, that isn’t the case. Weight-loss is always a tricky journey but don’t let the seasons stop you. Take advantage of the cold weather, and you can still be healthy and enjoy the new season with these tips! Illuminate your life; literally When your alarm rings, it’s practically a reflex to hit the snooze button, especially if it’s dark. Dark environments would tempt you to sleep longer which could lead lethargy and eventually weight gain. You’re aiming for weight-loss here. Rather than reaching for the snooze button, shoot for the light switch to help ease yourself out of bed. Light, whether it is natural or artificial acts as a trigger to alert the body to wake up. Bonus tip: put your alarm on the opposite side of your room so you REALLY get out of bed! Get the water rolling As soon as you’re out of bed, put the kettle on. Hot water with lemon and green tea are two great sips to beat the cold weather and help you meet your weight-loss goals. Apart from keeping you hydrated (duh), these two hot beverages are known to stimulate digestion and increase metabolism. Break your fast with a warm bowl of oatmeal Ok, alright, oatmeal doesn’t sound that glamorous but think about it. Picture a nice warm bowl of ooey-gooey oatmeal mixed with whatever you fancy – fresh or dried fruits, nuts, spices, you name it. You warm up your hands against the bowl, pick up the spoon, dig in, blow off some steam and indulge in the hearty goodness. Plus, it’s really good for you! Oatmeal is chock full of fiber and protein that helps fight off cholesterol and shrink waist size. The perfect bowl to help you achieve your weight-loss goals. Make more liquid comfort Liquid comfort, aka soup! Soup is one of the best ways to warm up and get loaded on nutrients at the same time. There’s a whole variety out there that are well-balanced, healthy and filling for you to try. Try mixing up different vegetables, broths, meats, and spices if you like to get new flavors. As mentioned earlier fiber is great for weight-loss and veggies are loaded! Spice things up Not only do spices add a whole new world of flavor to your dishes, but some spices also have warming effects such as ginger, cayenne, turmeric, and cinnamon. They help boost metabolism which helps the body burn fat and lead to weight-loss. You can add spices in everything from appetizers, soups, main courses, desserts, and even drinks. Warm up inside Don’t get shocked by the cold wind outside. Begin your workout routine inside. A quick warm-up of some jumping jacks or dance around the place to your favorite songs is a great way to warm up your body and your mind for what’s up ahead. Equip yourself It’s cold outside! Make sure you’re covered head to toe. Don’t worry, there’s loads of stylish outerwear made for winter to make the season active and fun. Also if your gym routine is after work, bring your gym bag with you. After a long day at work, in this weather, it’s so tempting to go home and bring your bag reminds you to hit the gym before you do. Take it outdoors If you can brave the cold, do it! Exercising in the cold weather can actually burn more calories because you’d naturally want to move faster to warm up your body. Also, the crisp air will help you breath better and those endorphins that come from a workout are bound to get you in a great mood. You’ll feel refreshed in no time! Netflix and gym This is kind of a cheat but instead of lying on the couch watching your favorite series why not bring it to the gym? Yes, you’re supposed to focus when you work out but sometimes a little distraction can motivate you to get there in the first place. Just be safe around the equipment and other people in the gym. Tag team Sometimes the best motivation comes in the form of another person. Be it your sibling, best friend, co-worker, whoever, work out together! Going out for a jog in the cold weather can feel like your dragging your feet but with a buddy, it might not be so bad. It may be cold but you can be cold together and later go have a cup of tea. There you have it! Ten ways you can still stick to your healthy lifestyle! Do you have any other tips on how to be healthy during winter? Comment them below!

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February 04, 2019
Lifeline Hospital
Health & Wellness Partner
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